Techlahoma Press

 

Oklahoma City Finds a Sweet Spot on America’s ‘Silicon Prairie’

Red Herring Media

“We want to be a hub for innovation activity where technologists, investors, designers, innovators and dreamers can all meet, collaborate, share and create new ideas and new businesses,” he adds.
“StarSpace46 wants to help create a “digital bridge” between communities in Oklahoma,” he adds. “This would allow a real time syndication of programming and content to multiple communities between not just Tulsa and OKC, but to all communities in Oklahoma.”
The space has already drawn some of the state’s most exciting young companies. Nodecraft is a local hosting service, while Monscierge, a hospitality software solution that has won over $6.5m in venture capital, is helping build StarSpace46’s digital infrastructure. Techlahoma, another local association, has been instrumental in the project.
So excited is OKC’s city hall with StarSpace46, that it is hoping to revamp the entire district around it. Yi believes it could be a new “Tech Row” for the city many simply call “The 405”.
Photo from Red Herring Media

Photo from Red Herring Media

 

 

Civic Hacking, Tulsa-Style

Intersections OK by Brett Dickerson

Episode 53 – Luke Crouch and Carlos Moreno are involved on their own unpaid time developing new tech tools to help all of the people of Tulsa connect to Tulsa city services and government. They are leaders in Code for Tulsa, an affiliate of Code for America, which promotes civic work by web and mobile code developers joining with civic activists.

 

 

Jesse and Amanda Harlin at Thunder Plains 4!

Intersections OK by Brett Dickerson

Episode 52 – These two interviews were conducted during day 2 of the Thunder Plains code developer conference that is in its fourth year. Jesse and Amanda Harlin have provided core leadership of the conference and its sponsoring organization Techlahoma Foundation from the beginning. I talk with Jesse and Amanda about how Thunder Plains has developed over four years and then talk with Aaron Endsley, a developer new to the work who became seriously interested when he attended his first Thunder Plains conference.

 

 

Matt Chandler – Developer – Code for OKC

Intersections OK by Brett Dickerson

Episode 46 – Computer code developers have volunteered their time and knowledge to bring greater transparency to city governments across the U.S. Code for OKC is a group of like-minded code developers who are working to make the budget of Oklahoma City much more useable for people who are not used to looking at massive city budget data. Matt tells us about the process and their progress.

 

 

Tommy Yi - Champion of tech co-working spaces in Oklahoma City

Intersections OK by Brett Dickerson

Episode 39 - First was the Unconference which led to OKC CoCo co-working space. Then came the 404 co-working space. Now, Tommy is once again in on another ground floor development of a new co-working space. This one is called StarSpace46. We talk about the opportunities that these co-working spaces have offered especially to startups and the tech community in Oklahoma City.

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Catherine Lippert – Code Developer, collaborator

Intersections OK by Brett Dickerson

Episode 37 – The solitary computer coder alone in a room is just not how code is developed any more. Instead, according to Chatherine, it is a collaborative, team effort that takes strong communication and social skills. She tells us about working for a company that values kindness and what it means to be a woman in a previously male dominated line of work.

 

 

Lyndon Alvarex of BuddyFX, a videography and motion graphics, created this video of 200OK, a Techlahoma conference in Tulsa, OK.

 

 
Watch a video tour of StarSpace46 online.

Watch a video tour of StarSpace46 online.

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Co-working space offers a place to
grow OKC's technology community

Article by Jesse Pound

The hope is that StarSpace can be a part of convincing tech-minded Oklahomans to stay in the state rather than migrate to Silicon Valley or other technology hubs. 
“As this becomes more of a community we will have more access to talent. People won't be going away,” said Jonathan Yarbor, co-founder and CTO of Nodecraft and a future tenant.

StarSpace is strongly tied with Techlahoma, a nonprofit organization that tries to foster the growth of the state's tech community. The vice president and secretary of Techlahoma are co-founders of StarSpace, and Techlahoma is running a capital campaign based on sponsorship of different rooms in StarSpace. 
“The alignment with our mission is practically in overlap,” said Jesse Harlin, president of Techlahoma.

Techlahoma will serve as an anchor tenant for StarSpace, regularly renting out the converted garage that will serve as an event space. A central meeting place is something the nonprofit has never had before.

“We're talking like 400 some-odd technologists who go through these groups every single month. So it's been really difficult to find a space up to this point,” Jesse Harlin said. “We've been kind of nomadic.”
“It's standing room only. We need the space,” said Amanda Harlin, secretary of the nonprofit"
 

 

Making Programming Magic Together
Inside OKC’s collaborative tech community

 Article By Brett Dickerson · Photos by Shannon Cornman


"Programming has very little to do about computers and a lot about people. Programming is very much a communication-oriented, people-centric thing."
- James Grey

"User groups seek to learn from each other on their own time, to increase the understanding of the code that they write. There is no pay for this, but a big pay-off of growth." 
- Brett Dickerson for 405 Magazine

"[...] you can make something that matters." "There are so many things that you can do to help communities through open-source software.” - Amanda Harlin

Her comments show a growing sense of civic-mindedness among programmers that is prominent on the Oklahoma City tech scene.
- Brett Dickerson for 405 Magazine

“My perspective is that it [Code for OKC's budget analysis and reporting] means more transparency and openness in local government, and giving citizens easier access to our information. So I really appreciate what they’re doing to make the budget information more accessible.”
- Doug Dowler, Oklahoma City's Budget Officer
Pictured Officers Ryan Hoegg, Amanda Harlin, and Jesse Harlin - Read the Article Online

Pictured Officers Ryan Hoegg, Amanda Harlin, and Jesse Harlin - Read the Article Online

Pictured Board Member Lucas Watson - Read the Article Online

Pictured Board Member Lucas Watson Read the Article Online

 

 

Oklahoma Innovations (by OCAST) Radio Interview

"There’s diversity in the kinds of people who are programming. Some folks are doing it for business. Some folks are doing it for government. Like you said, everyone needs it. And some folks are doing it for Open Source projects. They’re doing it just for the betterment of communities and the betterment of humans" - Jesse Harlin
 

 
"I am so thrilled to see such a fantastic community and conferences that have spun up around the community."
"I left town because there wasn't much of a tech industry and I went to Austin, which is where I now reside. It's such a thrill to come back each year to see the blossoming growth that's happening."
"What a fantastic conference. It only gets better and better every year. Its reputation precedes itself. I've literally been in other countries on the other side of the world and heard people mention Thunder Plains, that it's a fantastic conference."
- Kyle Simpson, Author of 'You Don't Know JS'
Quote by Kyle Simpson at Thunder Plains keynote 2015

Quote by Kyle Simpson at Thunder Plains keynote 2015

 

 

Quotes to be posted
Pam Selle: [4:50]

 

 

Quotes to be posted
Lara Hogan [4:15]

 

Lara Hogan, Senior Engineering Manager at Etsy, mentions Techlahoma in her Velocity Conference interview.

 

It’s amazing to me how vibrant this community is.
— Kyle Simpson

"I say this every time I'm here, it's amazing to me how vibrant this community is now that we can have conferences and meetups and so many people passionate about this stuff. One of the reasons, for better or worse, that I left for Austin back in the olden days when I was in school, there wasn't so much of this and I moved to find work. It's nice to see Oklahoma so on track."

- Kyle Simpson, author 'You Don't Know JS'

 

 

Quotes to be posted

Interview for Ugtastic  

Interview for Ugtastic